The Off Campus “Meal Plan”

After reading an article shared about Ricobene’s Steak Sandwich (here’s the article) I thought students ought to know about a few other popular spots near campus.

I am originally from Massachusetts and have lived in Bridgeport for three years.  During my three years I have eaten everywhere in the neighborhood, here are my favorites:

Bakery—Impallaria

If you don’t think Impallaria is the coolest bakery in town then you’re wrong, dead wrong.  Impallaria has been serving up fresh Italian baked goods since 1950 and the experience shows in how worth the guilt the treats are. While they are famous for their chocolate cake donut I am a frequent éclair and cannoli guy.  The cannoli selection is more limited than the all time world’s best cannoli of Mike’s Pastry in North End Boston, but the ricotta levels are on point.  Also, throw out what you know about éclairs before you walk in.  This monster is a quarter pound of custard.  At only a few bucks beware of your waistline.  Located at 30th and Wallace it’s a great weekend stroll (especially if you walk there by 29th because Bridgeport’s charming neighborhood vibe from our campus’s pseudo-urban feel).

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Mexican/Fast Food–Carbon  

Authentic? Eh.  Crave-worthy? YES!  Weather you order from their website, GrubHub, over the phone, or walk in you’re gonna have a good time.  If you like steak and elote don’t waste your time with anything other than the Stelote Burrito—it’s exactly what it sounds like.  Need some savory spice in your life?  Get roasted red pepper sauce with everything and put it on everything. 26th and Princeton if you’re going in person.

Italian—I’m torn here

Want a cool date spot close by? Go to Franco’s.  Being from Boston this is exactly what I expect from an Italian restaurant: small, the grandmother’s recipes are made by her grandsons and served by her granddaughters; all while she watches from her chair in the corner.  Take a date, take a friend, its ten minutes from the res halls at 31st and Princeton.  Lastly, get the gnocchi, that is all.

Want a lot of food right now?  Order from Mangia Fresca.  This place is actually owned by the cousins of the Impallaria owners.

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Coffee

A lot of people like Bridgeport Coffee.  They roast their own beans which makes then a bit more in line with current coffee trends, but forget about the story behind your beans and focus on what’s important: taste.  Drop what you’re doing and go to Jackalope.  Jackalope coffee has a great atmosphere of chaos and the coffee is stellar no matter what your get.  Like it hot? Agave Latte.  Like it Cold?  They have Stumptown Cold Brew Coffee on tap—yes tap.  It’s on 32nd between Halsted and Emerald.  Here is a photo of one my lattes with a foam teddy bear.  These guys and gals don’t mess around with coffee.

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Ice Cream and Ice

While there are not many options, we don’t need many.  If you want ice cream go get some with a side of doo wop from Scoop’s.  The owners are the same as Mangia Fresca so you can always pair your Butter Pecan ice cream with some decent espresso.  31st and Wallace, cash only.

Can’t handle the Ice Cream? That’s fine!  Grab an Italian Ice from Ferro’s just across the highway on 31st.  It’s also a grill/greasy-spoon so you can get cheese fries on the side.  This is also a cash only establishment.

Late Night

Even been craving burgers and fries at 4 am?  Me too, its fine, no need to admit it out load. Maxwell Street Depot is 24 Hours a day and cheap.  The fries come unsalted, but do not fret!  If you need some sodium to feel warm and fuzzy about your spuds they have it on the windowsill to add as you desire.  Only catch is you have to bring cash.  The walk is short here from dorms as it is at 31st and Canal.

I hope this helps you in all your dining endeavors.  May your food journeys be plenty and delicious.

Max Wiese, Applied Mathematics

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Love To Dance Collective: A Short History

LTD is a fairly young student organization on campus, only two years old this semester – and it is also a prime example of how feasible it is to start a student organization at IIT. We have auditions each semester, as well as an Open Class, where any student can come and take a break from their studies, get a small workout and learn some choreography!

We have already had auditions for this semester and have since been preparing for our first performance with Wesley Lo, a first year biomedical student, as the lead choreographer. This semester we are also VERY excited about the new multipurpose room in Keating Sports Center, with a barre, mirrors and harlequin floor; perfect for our rehearsals.

I spent my first semester at IIT focusing on school – but I really did miss dancing. In high school, dance was about 20 hours of my week, and it has always been an important outlet for me. Towards the end of my first semester here at IIT, I became friends with Sydney Hardwick and was very excited when she told me about her idea for starting another dance group on campus. A short time after, LTD was approved by SGA (Student Government Association), and we started to work hard to make LTD known on campus.

LTD feels like a family to me, and I am so happy to be a part of it. I have met and made friends with other dancers, gained leadership and choreography experience, and had a blast performing and working with a diverse group of students who share my love of dance.

If you have any questions about LTD or would like to be added to our mailing list for information about auditions and upcoming events – please contact us at ltddanceteam@gmail.com. We hope to see you at our next performance!

Check out our YouTube page to see some of our past performances. youtube.com/user/LTDdanceteam/videos

Lindsey Rice

Third-Year Architectural Engineering Student

Vice President of LTD

IMG_4582 LTD_logo LTD2013 unnamed

Scripting. In Architecture?

Four weeks marks the day. I had to learn how to script. As a second year Architecture student I found this quite challenging, but all I wanted was to make my 3D mental picture come alive in Unity just like the professors had enticed us with as they introduced what should be the finished product in four weeks time. It was tough, and took lots of time outside of class working with a very patient Design Communications professor to accomplish animating certain objects in this Unity simulation of the MTCC. We were working in groups, which made it much more practical to get things done and delivered on time.

The goal of the project was to model part (or all) of the MTCC (you could manipulate the layout of the building if you wanted) in Rhinoceros (a 3D modeling program) to the highest relevant level of detail, which you would then export into Unity (a game development program and powerful rendering engine). Once in Unity, you would have to set up lights, cameras, a skybox, and assets (for example: scripts), in order to make the MTCC come to life. Some took it a step further and actually made miniature games to play!blgg

This past week we all sat in lower east core of S.R. Crown Hall and took turns projecting our “video games” onto the large projector screen, awaiting review from our professors and one sit in judge. It was a great experience, all reviews went well and there were quite a few laughs exchanged!

Taylor Thompson, Architecture

Work at the Museum of Science and Industry this semester!

The Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) is the largest science museum in the western hemisphere, holding more than 35,000 artifacts and almost 14 acres of interactive exhibit space. MSI is contained in the former Palace of Fine Arts from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, and opened in 1933 under philanthropist Julius Rosenwald’s vision to create a hands-on industry museum in the United States. The museum recently celebrated its 80th birthday and continues to achieve its mission to “inspire the inventive genius in everyone” along with the help of some IIT students.

Photo courtesy of msi.org

Each semester, 12 Illinois Tech students have a chance to volunteer at the museum as part of a unique partnership between the university and the museum. Over the course of the volunteership, the students learn up to three interactive and hands-on demonstrations that they present to the general public at the museum. They get to work on their presentation and public speaking skills while working under the close mentorship of lead interns at the museum. The demonstrations that students present cover a fun variety of topics including Newtonian physics, sound, and magnetism. During the volunteership, students also get to explore and learn about one of the most well-known science museums in the country and meet people from all over the world. After completing their volunteer sessions at the museum, students are eligible to apply for a full-time paid internship at the museum over the summer.

During the internship, eight students learn and present a variety of live science demonstrations to museum guests on a daily basis. Over the course of the internship last summer, the Illinois Tech interns learned seven different programs and facilitated them with over 30,000 guests throughout the duration of the 12-week internship.

Interns work alongside a team of other year-round, full-time facilitators at the museum who help them learn demonstrations and improve communication skills. The year-round facilitators assist the IIT interns by observing their demonstrations and offering constructive criticism and feedback in regard content, style, and delivery.

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The programs that summer interns have learned and presented in previous summers include demonstrations from across all realms of science, from astronomy to biology. One show, “Happy Brrthday,” is an interactive mock birthday party for a famous scientist or inventor that features several experiments with liquid nitrogen and culminates in making liquid nitrogen ice cream for the audience. Another program, “Bangs, Flashes, and Fire,” MSI’s most highly-attended show, involves a series of explosive chemistry experiments where the audience learns about matter, combustion, and chemical reactions.

"Bangs, Flashes, and Fire" exibit

“Bangs, Flashes, and Fire” exibit

The MSI-IIT internship partnership is now entering its 7th year and is an exclusive partnership between the museum and Illinois Institute of Technology. This partnership began with a common trustee between IIT and MSI, and the program aims to foster communication skills in students while making science education accessible to the community through the delivery of several fun and interactive live science demonstrations at MSI.

The MSI-IIT Internship program has been one of the best parts of my experience at Illinois Tech. I volunteered at the museum during the fall of 2012, and I was selected as an intern for the summer of 2013. Now, I serve as a lead intern for the museum and help train new volunteers and interns as a part of the program.

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Volunteering and interning with the museum has helped me with so many things; my public speaking skills have improved, and I’ve learned a lot of fun scientific information that I’ve been able to share with the public. As a physics education major at IIT, this internship is the perfect combination of science and education for me, but it’s also helpful for students in any major. Regardless of one’s intended career path, they’ll need to be able to communicate their work to others outside their field, and the MSI-IIT Internship program allows students to practice doing just that. Volunteering and interning at the museum also helps student gain more self-confidence; a big part of presenting to the general public is learning how to improvise and trust yourself to do well, which translates into other areas.

The MSI Internship Program has become a highly competitive opportunity for IIT students over recent years. In order to become eligible for the volunteership and internship, students need to attend an information session taking place next week during the lunch hour on February 10th, 11th, and 12th. For more information, check out the Facebook event for the sessions here: https://www.facebook.com/events/275629295932291